Maintmaster blog - 12 March 2019


Be effective

Be effective

To be effective is to be prepared. When you have prepared for what might happen, and what you will need to do, a lot of time is saved because you won’t need to search, find out and get moving. If you take a second to add it all up, you soon will find that a great deal of time is lost just running around and finding information that you could have prepared in advance. Good order is the best way to be prepared. Then you create the conditions needed for being effective.

What can you do today to create the conditions needed to increase the efficiency of upcoming assignments?
Good order, in other words, is one of the most important aspects for maintenance engineers (and for anybody who wants to be effective).

Good order starts with leadership. If you are a manager, make sure that roles and responsibilities are clearly defined. It is only then that everyone will know what is expected of them or the responsibility that they have. It is only then that they know what they can do and decide upon. This is especially true for things that are a joint responsibility. In practice, joint responsibility means no one is responsible and it nearly always falls between two stools. Instead, make it clear that it is everybody’s responsibility, and assign powers to do something about it.

If you are not a manager, think about what you can do and do it. Good order concerns simple things and is something that most of us agree about, so you shouldn’t feel limited, even if you haven’t received the formal responsibility. Quite the opposite, you will probably be praised for pulling in the right direction. It is important to remember that is considerably more important that there is a structure than which structure is used. You do not need to choose the best structure, it is sufficient to choose a good structure. There, there will be good order. Once it is in place, it is much easier to make improvements and progress. So, my tip is this, choose the method for creating good order that can be put in place quickest and then improve it.

Examples of good order that benefit everybody:

Everything in its place (5S)
– Find the right thing quickly, spend less time searching
– Easier to see and realise if something is missing
– The total need is lower when everybody trusts that it works

Structure the spare parts’ storeroom
– Make sure that critical spare parts are in stock
– It is easier to have the correct quantity in place
– Everybody finds the parts that are stocked

Manage all instructions in the same place
– The right version is used
– Each instruction can be gradually improved
– Quicker to find the correct information

Make all drawings searchable
– Quicker trouble shooting
– Shorter stoppages

Gather together training and competence
– Everybody knows where to find the competence
– Easy to fill gaps in knowledge and any lack of competence
– Easy to plan when complicated assignments must be performed

Would you like more tips, or advice on how to create an understanding for planning and good order? We look forward to hearing from you!

/ Staffan Bergström, Project Manager, MaintMaster